3
Jul

What would you do if you weren’t doing this?

Everyone should pause every now and then and ask themselves this question: What would you want to be doing if you weren’t doing this? Whatever “this” is, your answer will be revealing. If you excitedly exclaim, “I would start a restaurant, using my grandma’s recipes, but it would be more of a modern look – […] Read More
2
Jul

Row Lattice Headers

The SGPANEL procedure makes it easy to create graph panels that are classified by one or more classifiers.  The "Panel" layout is the default and it places the classifier values in cell headers at the top of each cell. When using LAYOUT=Latice or RowLattice, the row headers are placed at […]

The post Row Lattice Headers appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

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2
Jul

Anonymization for data managers

I’ve spent some time over the past couple of months learning more about anonymization. This began with an interest in the technical methods used to protect sensitive personally-identifiable information in a SAS data warehouse and analytics platform we delivered for a customer. But I learned that anonymization has two rather different meanings; one in the […]

Anonymization for data managers was published on SAS Users.

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2
Jul

Summer of Coding

I'm always keen to encourage an awareness and uptake of coding in my kids. I think that coding brings a lot more than the simple ability to write programs. Coding requires a set of disciplines and an approach that are of great benefit in all walks of life.

As the summer holidays are upon us, with weeks upon weeks for kids to idle away their time, now is a good moment to revisit some of the online opportunities to give kids an insight into the joys of coding.

I've previously mentioned Scratch and App Inventor 2 (AI2) as two very accessible means for getting kids (and adults!) started, and producing a useful app that they can share with their friends very quickly. Both sites are free and use a clever building blocks interface to allow budding programmers to quickly understand the requirements of syntax. Scratch builds web-based apps and AI2 builds apps for Android devices (phones and tablets) with surprisingly powerful blocks for accessing web-based resources.

Scratch has always encouraged its users to share their work. Earlier this year App Inventor added its own gallery for showing and sharing.

Whilst it's not free, I've heard good things about Tynker. Tynker also takes the building blocks approach to syntax, and offers structured courses to help guide its students to exciting results.

Another means of getting your kids inspired is Lightbot. This is a series of programming-related puzzles featuring a cute robot character in a games app - available for Apple iOS, Android and other platforms. Great fun, and challenging too when you get to some of the higher levels.

As technology becomes more pervasive, traditional trades disappear, and the world of work becomes more globalised, the skills that newer members of the workforce need are changing: problem solving, team working, and communication are but three "21st century skills". Digital literacy (ability to find and use internet-based resources and information) and creativity— and the latter’s close relative, entrepreneurship—are close behind. And, the young have become more comfortable learning on their own, especially on topics of interest. They just need to be pointed in the right direction!



Follow me on Twitter: @aratcliffeuk

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1
Jul

Finding July 4th fireworks shows with SAS software!

A friend who recently moved to North Carolina from the west coast asked, "What's there to do around here for July 4th?" So I created a fireworks map, showing the locations of many of the celebrations around the state! Here's a snapshot of my map - click on it to […]

The post Finding July 4th fireworks shows with SAS software! appeared first on The SAS Training Post.

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1
Jul

Merge observed outcomes into a list of all outcomes

When you count the outcomes of an experiment, you do not always observe all of the possible outcomes. For example, if you roll a six-sided die 10 times, it might be that the "1" face does not appear in those 10 rolls. Obviously, this situation occurs more frequently with small […]

The post Merge observed outcomes into a list of all outcomes appeared first on The DO Loop.

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30
Jun

Top 3 reasons to attend Analytics 2015 in Las Vegas

I’m not a big gambler, but there is something I would put my money on – analytics. Analytics is helping companies turn information into value. And yes, I mean money. If you want to learn about the latest analytics trends and get in on some of that “value” – attend […]

The post Top 3 reasons to attend Analytics 2015 in Las Vegas appeared first on The SAS Training Post.

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30
Jun

Hit Your IT Knowledge Targets!

What I love most about the SAS community is the willingness to share information. I asked Tom Karl – how do you stay current with the complete deluge of new tools (Hadoop, Spark) and methods that are streaming toward you all the time.  He offered some advice and then I strong-armed (playground technique!) him into writing a blog post!  And yes Tom – you are invited ... Post Hit Your IT Knowledge Targets! appeared first on BI Notes for SAS® Users. Go to BI Notes for SAS® Users to subscribe.

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30
Jun

More Flash in Chrome for Less Power ... and the HTML5 Migration

If you use one of SAS's web interfaces you'll be a great fan of the flexibility and usability of the user interface. And those capabilities are probably provided by Adobe Flash. Your browser is running the Flash plug-in.

But Flash has one or two downsides, principally its tendency to use lots of CPU cycles which in-turn uses lots of battery power. Not a problem maybe if you're hooked to the mains, but not good on a laptop of mobile phone/tablet.

If you use the Chrome browser you'll be pleased to hear that Google are improving Chrome's power consumption when Flash is running. When you’re on a webpage that runs Flash, Chrome will intelligently pause content, e.g. Flash animations, that aren't central to the webpage, while keeping central content (like a video) playing without interruption. If Chrome accidentally pause something you were interested in, you can just click it to resume playback. This update significantly reduces power consumption, allowing us to do analytics on-the-go for longer before having to hunt for a power outlet.

This feature was enabled by default on Chrome’s desktop Beta channel in June, and will be rolling out soon to everyone else on Chrome desktop.

Looking longer-term, SAS are replacing their use of Flash with HTML5. Whilst the use of Flash requires a plug-in from Adobe, HTML5 is supported by all modern browsers out-of-the-box, with no need for any plug-in. The majority of web sites and vendors are migrating to HTML5 due to its net neutrality and power-consumption benefits. SAS Studio already uses HTML5; Visual Analytics and Visual Statistics currently use Flash. We can expect a migration to HTML5, perhaps starting with the VA hub this summer, which will probably be complete next year.



Follow me on Twitter: @aratcliffeuk

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29
Jun

Born to be wild - analyzing motorcycle data

What is it that people like so much about motorcycles? The thrill/excitement/freedom of riding them, the 'biker image' portrayed in movies, or great songs such as Little Honda by the Hondells? I'm not a biker per say, but I do have a couple of motorcycles, and am a known associate […]

The post Born to be wild - analyzing motorcycle data appeared first on The SAS Training Post.

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