2
Mar

Series plot with varying attributes

This article is motivated by a recent question on the SAS Communities board.  This user wants to create a series or spline plot where the attributes of the line (color, thickness) can be changed based on another variable. In this case it may be a binary variable with "0" and [...]

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19
Feb

Survival plot with a twist using SGPLOT procedure

Survival plots are automatically created by the LIFETEST procedure.  These graphs are most often customized to fit the needs of SAS users.  One way to create the customized survival plot is to save the generated data from the LIFETEST procedure, and then use the SGPLOT procedure to create your custom [...]

The post Survival plot with a twist using SGPLOT procedure appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

5
Feb

Dual Response Axis Bar and Line Overlay - Part 1

A dual response axis chart is useful when the data type for the multiple measures are not compatible.  For example, when overlaying measures like "This Year" sales with "Last Year" sales, the format and magnitudes of the two measures (or values for two groups) may be compatible, and it is [...]

The post Dual Response Axis Bar and Line Overlay - Part 1 appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

19
Dec

Getting started with SGPLOT - Part 9 - Bubble Plot

This is the 9th installment of the "Getting Started" series, and the audience is the user who is new to the SG Procedures. It is quite possible that an experienced users may also find some useful nuggets here.  In this article, we will cover the basics of the BUBBLE plot. [...]

The post Getting started with SGPLOT - Part 9 - Bubble Plot appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

4
Dec

Little things go a long way

In my previous post, I described a new options to control the widths of the caps for Whiskers, Error and Limit bars.  This topic could have been titled "Little things go a long way", as such details really make for a good graph. In a similar manner, another detail issue [...]

The post Little things go a long way appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

27
Nov

Customizing cap widths

The SG procedures and GTL statements do a lot of work for us to display the data using the specified statements.  This includes setting many details such as arrow heads, line patterns etc, including caps.  Often, such details have a fixed design according to what seems reasonable for most use [...]

The post Customizing cap widths appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

14
Nov

Spark table

In the previous post, I discussed creating a 2D grid of spark lines by Year and Claim Type.  This graph was presented in the SESUG conference held last week on SAS campus in the paper ""Methods for creating Sparklines using SAS" by Rick Andrews.  This grid of sparklines was actually the [...]

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10
Nov

Spark grid

The 25th annual SESUG conference was held at in the SAS campus this week.  I had the opportunity to meet and chat with many users and attend many excellent presentations.  I will write about those that stood out (graphically) in my view. One excellent presentation was on "Methods for creating [...]

The post Spark grid appeared first on Graphically Speaking.

8
Nov

Long category values

The South East SAS Users Group meeting wound up yesterday.  The 25th anniversary conference was held on SAS Campus and it provided a great opportunity to meet with many enthusiastic SAS users and attend many informative presentations.  More on this in a follow-up article. During one of these presentations, Mary [...]

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1
Nov

Legend order redux

Once in a while you run into a pesky situation that is hard to overcome without resorting to major surgery.  Such a situation occurs when you have a stacked bar chart with a discrete legend positioned vertically on the side of the graph.  A simple example is shown below. title [...]

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