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Tips:Saving Your Work with the SAS Display Manager Autosave Feature

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Did you know that you can avoid the loss of SAS for Windows programs due to sudden power outages—such as those caused by violent summer thunderstorms—by using the Autosave feature in SAS Display Manager.

The Autosave feature saves a copy of SAS programs opened in the Enhanced Editor in the following directory:

  • C:\Documents and Settings\YOUR_USER_ID\Application Data\SAS\EnhancedEditor . . . where YOUR_USER_ID is your Windows User Id.

Programs saved to that directory have the following naming convention:

  • Autosave of YOUR_PROGRAM_NAME.$AS . . . whhere YOUR_PROGRAM_NAME is the name of the SAS program you have open in SAS Display Manager. For example:

Autosave of Logon to Linux Server Upload Data Create Index.$AS . . . is a program that I currently have open for editing. If you suffer a sudden loss of power, you can navigate to the directory, above, open the latest Autosaved copy of your program, cut and paste it back into your SAS Display manager, and then save it.

The default value for SAS's Autosave is 10 minutes. So, every 10 minutes, SAS will update the Autosaved copy of your program in the EnhancedEditor directory. You can modify that value by doing the following in SAS Display Manager:

  1. Click on Tools
  2. Navigate down the Tools drop-down list and highlight Options
  3. Click on Preferences in the Options drop-down list
  4. Click on the Edit tab in the Preferences window
  5. Make sure the "Autosave every" check box is checked
  6. Set the number of minutes you want to have between Autosaves of your SAS program

The SAS Autosave feature can save you a lot of time and effort recovering your SAS programs when there is an unexpected loss of power or reboot of your workstation.

Submitted by Michael A. Raithel, The man who wrote the book on performance. Contact me at my Discussion Page.